USCIS certified translation

CIT: Cal Interpreting & Translations Serving A Global Business Market

uSCIS translation Services

Cal Interpreting & Translations provides USCIS certified translation of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services documents. We can optionally notarize your documents for those requiring apostille service.

If you are asking yourself, “Do I need my birth certificate, certified, notarized, or both?” We have the answers below.

Should My Document be Certified and Notarized?

In most cases, only one is required to obtain either a notarized translation or a certified translation. However, just a few years ago the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) required that all certified translations also be notarized. Recently, the USCIS has changed the rules, no longer requiring the translation to be notarized, only certified. Since regulations and requirements are constantly changing, it is important to work with an adept and up-to-date agency like CIT for USCIS certified translation.

The professional translators and notary publics at CIT attend conferences and events to stay up to date on the most recent regulations, ensuring that your document is translated as needed. USCIS translators at CIT understand that the immigration process can be very scary, confusing, and overwhelming. At CIT we have completed hundreds of USCIS certified translations, so we can help you through this difficult process.

What is a Certified Translation?

A certified translation is accompanied by a signed statement from the translator, indicating that the translation is a true and accurate representation of the original document. Certified translations are often required for legal documents including court transcripts, adoption agreements, business contracts, immigration documents, and birth, death, or marriage certificates.

What is a Notarized Translation?

A notarized translation requires official procedures that must be strictly adhered to. A notarized translation must be completed by a notary public. A notary public is a person who has been authorized by the government to oversee and authenticate legal documents, including notarized translations. Notarized translations are often needed for education-based documents, including high school transcripts and foreign diplomas.

What is the Difference Between a Certified vs Notarized Translation?

At CIT, we understand that you rely on us for perfection and efficiency. CIT’s translation experts can help you determine if you need a certified or notarized translation. Here, we have compiled some basic information regarding the differences between certified translations and notarized translations. In addition, we strive for excellence in providing certified translations for USCIS, as we frequently work in the area.

uSCIS FAQS

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is the federal agency that oversees lawful immigration to the United States. They are a component of the Department of Homeland Security. With CIT you receive a 100% USCIS translation guarantee.

A notarized translation should be completed by a professional translator. However, the translator does not need to be a certified translator to provide a notarized translation. The completed translation is viewed by a notary public, who swears an oath to its accuracy and signs an affidavit with their official seal.

This may seem like a tricky question. At CIT, translation clients often come to us confused, having been told that they need a certified translator to complete a certified translation. This is actually not the case. The certified translators at CIT are professionals who have passed a translation exam and received their translation certification from an organization like the American Translators Association. However, a certified translation does not need to be done by a certified translator. A certified translation refers to a translation completed by a qualified professional interpreter who then completes the certification process. The translation includes a signed Certificate of Accuracy, testifying to this. A certified translation functions as a legal record, which is why government and legal entities always require certified translations.

WHY WAIT?
CONTACT US.

Single Documents Accepted
No Minimum Project Size
No Extra Fee For Certified
Open 24/7
24 hour

WHY WAIT?
CONTACT US.

Single Documents Accepted
No Minimum Project Size
No Extra Fee For Certified
Open 24/7
24 hour
CIT IN SOCIAL MEDIA
To Our California Interpreting Clients: CIT Employees Certified CAL. EVID. CODE § 754 Translators

There are approximately 10,000,000 (ten million) people who have hearing loss in the United States, and it’s estimated that about 1,000,000 (one million) of them are considered functionally deaf. As a result, The 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act requires businesses to accommodate these disabilities by making reasonable accommodations for normal day-to-day communication needs such as providing sign language or captioning during remote video meetings so those participating can communicate more easily.

The ability to reserve a certified sign-language interpreter is of paramount importance. Our professional courteous and experienced interpreters are the logical choices in facilitating communications between the hearing enabled, people who are deaf or hard-of hear, they can also help those that have limited speech due to medical conditions like paralysis caused by stroke
or ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis).

Cal Interpreting & Translations
Local Offices

12304 Santa Monica Blvd. Ste. 300
Los Angeles, CA 90025

Cal Interpreting & Translations
Corporate Offices

2501 W. Burbank Blvd. Ste. 311
Burbank, CA 91505

Scroll to Top CALL NOW