CIT offers Tongan interpreters and translators with legal, medical and specialty experience, including criminal and civil matters, employee meetings, engineering, patent cases, labor disputes, immigration and more.

Although based in Los Angeles, CIT offers comprehensive Tonga language services including interpretation, translation and transcription, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, worldwide. Our interpreters and translators are native speakers who have been screened, certified, have provided credentials, field tested, and kept up to date with developments in both English and the Tongan language through means such as lectures, conferences, and travel. CIT’s Tongan language interpreters and translators possess in depth knowledge of the Tonga language, as well as of the culture and history of the Tongan people, allowing them to provide informed and complete interpretation and translation.

The Tongan Language

The Tonga language, spoken by about 95,000 people, is a Polynesian language part of the Austonesian languages. The Tongan language is spoken mainly in Tonga. However, there are other countries that have Tongan speakers such as American Samoa, Australia, Fiji, New Zealand, Vanuatu, Canada and the US. The Tongan language is quite similar to Niue, Wallisian and Simoan. Tonga is located in the southwest of the Pacific Ocean. There are three main groups that the 170 Tongan Islands are divided into. They are Tongatapu (south), Ha’apai (center) and Vava’u (north).

The first recordings of the Tongan language were in the early 1800s, a job done by missionaries. Modern day written Tongan was originally broadcasted in 1943 by the Privy Council of Tonga.

Tonga is made up of two sections, or chains, or islands. The capital of Nuku’alofa is located on the Tongatapu Island. The islands on the west are known as high islands whereas the islands on the east are referred to as low islands. The high islands are referred to this name because they are much higher than sea level due to volcanoes. There are four islands that currently have active volcanoes. The largest island is Tongatapu Island. It is also the most densely populated Tongan island. Due to natural erosion, particularly in Vava’u, the result is a lot of caves, sheer cliffs and sandspits. The weather in Tonga is semitropical. Because the northern islands are closer to the equator, they are more susceptible to experiencing typhoons.

There are several birds that are popular in Tonga, including rails, kingfishers, doves and starlings, among many others. Additionally, some of the most beautiful birds in the world, such as the red-breasted musk parrot live on Tongan islands.

As Tonga is a Polynesian country, almost all those living on the islands have Polynesian ancestry. However, it is becoming increasingly common that Tongans are marrying Europeans since the 1970s. The Tongans take religion very seriously. The most common religion is Christianity, although some are also part of the Methodist, Catholic and Mormon churches. Some belong to a small group of Protestants as well. Tongan is taught in schools and is an official language along with English.

The primary staple of the Tongan economy is agriculture. The most popular crops are coconuts, vanilla bean, bananas and squash. Other imported crops are corn, breadfruit, pineapple, watermelons, limes and tomatoes. Along with agriculture, Tonga is known for livestock, fishing and timber. Tonga imports products from New Zealand, Singapore, the US and Fiji and exports to New Zealand, Japan, Australia and the US.